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  • New print! Urnes-style ornament backpatch and t-shirt.

    Hand pulled screenprint on 100% organic cotton fabric.

    We ship worldwide! Link in bio.
    The Urnes-style, named after the famous Urnes stave Church in Sognefjord, Norway, represents the last phase of development and expansion of Viking art. This particular style evolved from the previous Ringerike style from the first half of the eleventh century onward. A fluted silver bowl found in the Lilla Valla hoard is usually considered one of the most effective examples of this stylistic switch. It’s also important to take into account that the Urnes style reached its peak during the diffusion of Christianity in Scandinavia, thus gaining momentum from it, having been used for the decoration of stave churches, croziers and religious motifs. The main element at the centre of the Urnes style is the Great Beast, as represented in this particular screenprinted design. The Great Beast is always surrounded by ribbon-like animals, each one biting each other in a constant flow and loop. The style can be admired far and wide in the Scandinavian and late Viking world: from the famous silver brooch of Lindholm Høje and the reconstructed panels of the Moesgård Museum church, both in Denmark, to the openwork Icelandic brooch from Tröllaskógur, from the woodworks on the Hørning stave church to Swedish runestones and even over the sea, on the famous Cross of Cong, Co. Mayo, Ireland, in what is now known as Irish-Urnes style.

    Our screenprinted design, a readaptation of the Urnes church portal masterpiece, revolves around the central figure, which is a slender version of a walking quadruped or Great Beast, which bites the body of other ribbon-shaped animals in a combat motif. The foliate tails of the snake-like ribbon animals have been interpreted by many as a representation of the Norse Yggdrasil or the Christian Tree of Life.

    Artwork by @jonaslaumarkussen — thank you so much!
  • New print! Urnes-style ornament backpatch and t-shirt.

Hand pulled screenprint on 100% organic cotton fabric.

We ship worldwide! Link in bio. 
The Urnes-style, named after the famous Urnes stave Church in Sognefjord, Norway, represents the last phase of development and expansion of Viking art. This particular style evolved from the previous Ringerike style from the first half of the eleventh century onward. A fluted silver bowl found in the Lilla Valla hoard is usually considered one of the most effective examples of this stylistic switch. It’s also important to take into account that the Urnes style reached its peak during the diffusion of Christianity in Scandinavia, thus gaining momentum from it, having been used for the decoration of stave churches, croziers and religious motifs. The main element at the centre of the Urnes style is the Great Beast, as represented in this particular screenprinted design. The Great Beast is always surrounded by ribbon-like animals, each one biting each other in a constant flow and loop. The style can be admired far and wide in the Scandinavian and late Viking world: from the famous silver brooch of Lindholm Høje and the reconstructed panels of the Moesgård Museum church, both in Denmark, to the openwork Icelandic brooch from Tröllaskógur, from the woodworks on the Hørning stave church to Swedish runestones and even over the sea, on the famous Cross of Cong, Co. Mayo, Ireland, in what is now known as Irish-Urnes style.

Our screenprinted design, a readaptation of the Urnes church portal masterpiece, revolves around the central figure, which is a slender version of a walking quadruped or Great Beast, which bites the body of other ribbon-shaped animals in a combat motif. The foliate tails of the snake-like ribbon animals have been interpreted by many as a representation of the Norse Yggdrasil or the Christian Tree of Life.

Artwork by @jonaslaumarkussen — thank you so much!
  •  189  9 24 September, 2018