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  • I had to try a 🌙 shot! (Aldebaran)

    Phase: Waxing gibbous(85%) Distance from earth: 383 000 km

    Btw: I truly am sorry for the length of what I’ve written😩🙏🏽 Disclaimer: Not by any means am I an expert at what I am describing down below nor am I a 100% sure if I am telling it the right way, but I am telling it the way I understood it. And this might actually be what dithering is, So please bare with me and please correct me if I am saying anything wrong😅

    I came across this “new technique”, at least for my self as I was reading about dithering( a way to make sharper images in your deepsky photos) and came across this link on, “ enhance! A practical super resolution tutorial in Adobe Photoshop “, by a member of the “photon collective”, Ian Norman. Basically increasing the amount of pixels in your pictures with upwards of quadrupled the amount that your camera sensor has. So for mine Nikon D5100 which has a 16.2 megapixel Sensor, I should basically with this technique get an image with about 64.8 megapixels and this without spending a dime more on a new camera, only by taking more images( of the same subject) and adding them to photoshop for processing. (http://photoncollective.com/enhance-practical-superresolution-in-adobe-photoshop)

    The thing was that I wasn’t sure if this technique would work on my moon image, because of reasons described in the link above, and was it really worth doing this for every image, given the fact that it would take up much more space and take a longer time to process compared to stacking in the normal sense, and would it be a big enough of a difference compared to stacking?
    Image 1:
    With the so called super resolution ( 20 images all in all)
    Image 2:
    Normal stacking in Photoshop ( 20 images all I all

    Image 3:
    A cropped comparison of the Copernicus crater, with the super resolution to the left and the stacked(median filter) on the right

    Conclusion:
    In my mind it has definitely made a difference in the sense that the technique has increased the number of pixels making the scene smoother. I will definitely try it again!
  • I had to try a 🌙 shot! (Aldebaran)

Phase: Waxing gibbous(85%) Distance from earth: 383 000 km

Btw: I truly am sorry for the length of what I’ve written😩🙏🏽 Disclaimer: Not by any means am I an expert at what I am describing down below nor am I a 100% sure if I am telling it the right way, but I am telling it the way I understood it. And this might actually be what dithering is, So please bare with me and please correct me if I am saying anything wrong😅

I came across this “new technique”, at least for my self as I was reading about dithering( a way to make sharper images in your deepsky photos) and came across this link on, “ enhance! A practical super resolution tutorial in Adobe Photoshop “, by a member of the “photon collective”, Ian Norman. Basically increasing the amount of pixels in your pictures with upwards of quadrupled the amount that your camera sensor has. So for mine Nikon D5100 which has a 16.2 megapixel Sensor, I should basically with this technique get an image with about  64.8 megapixels and this without spending a dime more on a new camera, only by taking more images( of the same subject) and adding them to photoshop for processing. (http://photoncollective.com/enhance-practical-superresolution-in-adobe-photoshop)

The thing was that I wasn’t sure if this technique would work on my moon image, because of reasons described in the link above, and was it really worth doing this for every image, given the fact that it would take up much more space and take a longer time to process compared to stacking in the normal sense, and would it be a big enough of a difference compared to stacking? 
Image 1: 
With the so called super resolution ( 20 images all in all) 
Image 2:
Normal stacking in Photoshop ( 20 images all I all

Image 3:
A cropped comparison of the Copernicus crater, with the super resolution to the left and the stacked(median filter) on the right

Conclusion: 
In my mind it has definitely made a difference in the sense that the technique has increased the number of pixels making the scene smoother. I will definitely try it again!
  •  13  2 50 minutes ago